Quotes

Trauma Informed Working – Principle 9

 

“Trauma-informed practices move from asking “what is wrong with you?” to “what has happened to you?” They understand and respond to the high prevalence of trauma and its effects, as well as understanding that experiences of trauma can lead … to developing coping strategies and behaviours that may appear to be harmful or dangerous.”

Sweeney A et al

 

“…whilst not all mental health is about trauma, all trauma is about mental health…”

Clinical psychologist

 

“… there are compelling reasons for trauma-informed care to be integral to all public sector services.”

Wilson J and Williams A 2019

 

“Trauma-informed care is fundamentally concerned with creating conditions that reduce harm and promote healing, especially in individuals who have already experienced psychological trauma. It recognises that experiencing trauma in the past can affect the ways a person perceives and responds to their environment in the present.”

Wilson J and Williams A 2019

 

“Some people’s lives seem to flow in a narrative; mine had many stops and starts. That’s what trauma does. It interrupts the plot … It just happens, and then life goes on. No one prepares you for it.”

Stern J in van der Kolk B

 

“Trauma-informed practices move from asking “what is wrong with you?” to “what has happened to you?” They understand and respond to the high prevalence of trauma and its effects, as well as understanding that experiences of trauma can lead … to developing coping strategies and behaviours that may appear to be harmful or dangerous.”

Sweeney A et al

 

“Trauma arises as a delayed or protracted response to a stressful event or situation (of either brief or long duration) of an exceptionally threatening or catastrophic nature, which is likely to cause pervasive distress in almost anyone.”

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence 2018; International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10) WHO Version 2016

 

“The problem is that buried trauma doesn’t go away. It remains and continues to grow, until ultimately, it surfaces in unexpected and disproportionate ways.”

Judith Zackson

 

 

 

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